melody

[mel-uh-dee]
noun, plural melodies.
1.
musical sounds in agreeable succession or arrangement.
2.
Music.
a.
the succession of single tones in musical compositions, as distinguished from harmony and rhythm.
b.
the principal part in a harmonic composition; the air.
c.
a rhythmical succession of single tones producing a distinct musical phrase or idea.
3.
a poem suitable for singing.
4.
intonation, as of a segment of connected speech.

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English melodie < Medieval Latin melōdia < Greek melōidía (choral) singing, equivalent to mel- (see melic) + -ōid- (see ode) + -ia -y3

melodyless, adjective
undermelody, noun, plural undermelodies.

malady, melody.


1. See harmony. 2. tune, song, descant, theme.
Dictionary.com Unabridged

Melody

[mel-uh-dee]
noun
a female given name.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
melody (ˈmɛlədɪ)
 
n , pl -dies
1.  music
 a.  a succession of notes forming a distinctive sequence; tune
 b.  Compare harmony the horizontally represented aspect of the structure of a piece of music
2.  sounds that are pleasant because of tone or arrangement, esp words of poetry
 
[C13: from Old French, from Late Latin melōdia, from Greek melōidia singing, from melos song + -ōidia, from aoidein to sing]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

melody
late 13c., from O.Fr. melodie, from L.L. melodia, from Gk. meloidia "singing, chanting, a tune for lyric poetry," from melos "song, part of song," originally "limb" + oide "song, ode."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences for melody
Percussion instruments play not only rhythm, but also melody and harmony.
The dance form of jazz was characterized by a sweet and romantic melody.
It is comparable to what happens when a new note is added to a melody.
He made substantial modifications to harmony, melody, dynamics, etc.
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