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Denotation vs. Connotation

mete1

[meet] /mit/
verb (used with object), meted, meting.
1.
to distribute or apportion by measure; allot; dole (usually followed by out):
to mete out punishment.
2.
Archaic. to measure.
Origin of mete1
900
before 900; Middle English; Old English metan; cognate with Dutch meten, Old Norse meta, Gothic mitan, German messen to measure, Greek mḗdesthai to ponder
Related forms
unmeted, adjective
Synonyms
1. deal, measure, parcel.

mete2

[meet] /mit/
noun
1.
a limiting mark.
2.
a limit or boundary.
Origin
1275-1325; Middle English < Middle French < Latin mēta goal, turning post
Synonyms
2. bound.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for metes
Historical Examples
  • But in order to show that it is central, he must limit the universe and give its circumference, metes and bounds.

    The Universe a Vast Electric Organism George Woodward Warder
  • The suffering that it metes out to its victims is indescribable.

    Woman William J. Robinson
  • The past was so recent that statesmen were timid, and they wanted their metes and bounds to be fixed by a monument.

    The Life of Napoleon Bonaparte William Milligan Sloane
  • She closes the volume, and, musing, metes him out the hours and days he has to live.

    Lucretia, Complete Edward Bulwer-Lytton
  • In fiction coincidence has its metes and bounds beyond which it dare not step.

    From Place to Place Irvin S. Cobb
  • But what were the metes and bounds of this province which had been so often bought and sold?

  • I dine with them in Philadelphia; the joy is unconfined and measured neither by metes nor bounds.

  • So we could mark well the metes and bounds of the camp and prick in all the items.

    The Master of Appleby Francis Lynde
  • Do not contend against the great Law which metes out suffering in return for vice.'

  • The value of a thing is what it will fetch, no doubt, and yet that is a doctrine which metes out half-justice only.

    The Hills and the Vale Richard Jefferies
British Dictionary definitions for metes

mete1

/miːt/
verb (transitive)
1.
(usually foll by out) (formal) to distribute or allot (something, often unpleasant)
verb, noun
2.
(poetic, dialect) (to) measure
Word Origin
Old English metan; compare Old Saxon metan, Old Norse meta, German messen to measure

mete2

/miːt/
noun
1.
(rare) a mark, limit, or boundary (esp in the phrase metes and bounds)
Word Origin
C15: from Old French, from Latin mēta goal, turning post (in race)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for metes

mete

v.

"to allot," Old English metan "to measure, mete out; compare, estimate" (class V strong verb; past tense mæt, past participle meten), from Proto-Germanic *metanan (cf. Old Saxon metan, Old Frisian, Old Norse meta, Dutch meten, Old High German mezzan, German messen, Gothic mitan "to measure"), from PIE *med- "to take appropriate measures" (see medical). Used now only with out. Related: Meted; meting.

n.

"boundary," now only in phrase metes and bounds, late 15c., from Old French mete "limit, bounds, frontier," from Latin meta "goal, boundary, post, pillar."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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