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mince

[mins] /mɪns/
verb (used with object), minced, mincing.
1.
to cut or chop into very small pieces.
2.
to soften, moderate, or weaken (one's words), especially for the sake of decorum or courtesy.
3.
to perform or utter with affected elegance.
4.
to subdivide minutely, as land or a topic for study.
verb (used without object), minced, mincing.
5.
to walk or move with short, affectedly dainty steps.
6.
Archaic. to act or speak with affected elegance.
noun
7.
something cut up very small; mincemeat.
Idioms
8.
not mince words / matters, to speak directly and frankly; be blunt or outspoken:
He was angry and didn't mince words.
Origin
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English mincen < Middle French minc(i)er < Vulgar Latin *minūtiāre to mince; see minute2
Related forms
mincer, noun
unminced, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for minced
  • Identifying details are always minced and pureed, and confidentiality is guaranteed.
  • Usually filled with minced pork or a mixture of pork, beef and/or veal, it can also be made with other kinds of meat.
  • Soups include egg drop soup to minced chicken and corn soup.
  • While it boils gently, warm the olive oil in a sauté pan, then add the minced garlic and whole peppers.
  • Season with salt as needed, and serve in bowls garnished with minced dill and a dollop of sour cream.
  • Let the mixture boil for a minute or so, to begin to emulsify the oil, and then add half a cup of minced white onion.
  • The partial coatings contain low fat cocoa coating, minced hazelnut, and two biscuits.
British Dictionary definitions for minced

mince

/mɪns/
verb
1.
(transitive) to chop, grind, or cut into very small pieces
2.
(transitive) to soften or moderate, esp for the sake of convention or politeness: I didn't mince my words
3.
(intransitive) to walk or speak in an affected dainty manner
noun
4.
(mainly Brit) minced meat
5.
(informal) nonsensical rubbish
Word Origin
C14: from Old French mincier, from Vulgar Latin minūtiāre (unattested), from Late Latin minūtia smallness; see minutiae
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for minced

mince

v.

late 14c., "to chop in little pieces," from Old French mincier "make into small pieces," from Vulgar Latin *minutiare "make small," from Late Latin minutiæ "small bits," from Latin minutus "small" (see minute (adj.)). Of speech, "to clip affectedly in imitation of elegance," 1540s; of words or language, "to restrain in the interest of decorum," 1590s. Meaning "to walk with short or precise steps" is from 1560s. Related: Minced; mincing.

n.

"minced meat," 1850; see mincemeat.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for minced

mince

noun

An unfashionable or tedious person; bore; drip: Anybody who still wears saddle shoes is a ''mince'' (1960s+ Students)


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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11
14
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