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minion

[min-yuh n] /ˈmɪn yən/
noun
1.
a servile follower or subordinate of a person in power.
2.
a favored or highly regarded person.
3.
a minor official.
4.
Printing. a 7-point type.
adjective
5.
dainty; elegant; trim; pretty.
Origin
1490-1500
1490-1500; < Middle French mignon, for Old French mignot dainty < ?
Can be confused
minion, minyan.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for minions
  • Also psychopaths are in the game for themselves having minions would be restrictive.
  • He should thank all his minions for slavishly working to make him so.
  • He is such a proud spirit, so much more grounded in truth than the rest of us minions.
  • It is also quite funny to watch the other minions here, who have no clue either.
  • Us minions wouldn't know any better, but those who are paid to know would know.
  • Depending on the size of your family, you're looking at a sizable extra chunk of change for your minions to see those minions.
  • While they may not launch a missile they would give it to their minions.
  • Leave it to economists and their minions, and ideologues to come up with that one.
  • Keep the minions powerless and toothless, build a fortress around yourself and remove any trace of conscience.
  • Without supporting political hacks and their minions.
British Dictionary definitions for minions

minion

/ˈmɪnjən/
noun
1.
a favourite or dependant, esp a servile or fawning one
2.
a servile agent: the minister's minions
3.
a size of printer's type, approximately equal to 7 point
adjective
4.
dainty, pretty, or elegant
Word Origin
C16: from French mignon, from Old French mignot, of Gaulish origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for minions

minion

n.

c.1500, "a favorite; a darling; a low dependant; one who pleases rather than benefits" [Johnson], from Middle French mignon "a favorite, darling" (n.), also a term of (probably homosexual) abuse;" as an adjective, "dainty, pleasing, favorite," from Old French mignot "pretty, attractive, dainty, gracious, affectionate," perhaps of Celtic origin (cf. Old Irish min "tender, soft"), or from Old High German minnja, minna "love, memory" (see mind (n.)). Used 16c.-17c. without disparaging overtones.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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9
12
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