follow Dictionary.com

11 Trending Words of 2014

mint1

[mint] /mɪnt/
noun
1.
any aromatic herb of the genus Mentha, having opposite leaves and small, whorled flowers, as the spearmint and peppermint.
Compare mint family.
2.
a soft or hard confection, often shaped like a wafer, that is usually flavored with peppermint and often served after lunch or dinner.
3.
any of various flavored hard candies packaged as a roll of small round wafers.
adjective
4.
made or flavored with mint:
mint tea.
Origin
1000
before 1000; Middle English, Old English minte (cognate with Old High German minza) < Latin ment(h)a < Greek mínthē

mint2

[mint] /mɪnt/
noun
1.
a place where coins, paper currency, special medals, etc., are produced under government authority.
2.
a place where something is produced or manufactured.
3.
a vast amount, especially of money:
He made a mint in oil wells.
adjective
4.
Philately. (of a stamp) being in its original, unused condition.
5.
unused or appearing to be newly made and never used:
a book in mint condition.
verb (used with object)
6.
to make (coins, money, etc.) by stamping metal.
7.
to turn (metal) into coins:
to mint gold into sovereigns.
8.
to make or fabricate; invent:
to mint words.
Origin
before 900; Middle English mynt, Old English mynet coin < Latin monēta coin, mint, after the temple of Juno Monēta, where Roman money was coined
Related forms
minter, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
British Dictionary definitions for mintest

mint1

/mɪnt/
noun
1.
any N temperate plant of the genus Mentha, having aromatic leaves and spikes of small typically mauve flowers: family Lamiaceae (labiates). The leaves of some species are used for seasoning and flavouring See also peppermint, spearmint, horsemint, water mint
2.
stone mint, another name for dittany (sense 2)
3.
a sweet flavoured with mint
Derived Forms
minty, adjective
Word Origin
Old English minte, from Latin mentha, from Greek minthē; compare Old High German minza

mint2

/mɪnt/
noun
1.
a place where money is coined by governmental authority
2.
a very large amount of money: he made a mint in business
adjective
3.
(of coins, postage stamps, etc) in perfect condition as issued
4.
(Brit, informal) excellent; impressive
5.
in mint condition, in perfect condition; as if new
verb
6.
to make (coins) by stamping metal
7.
(transitive) to invent (esp phrases or words)
Derived Forms
minter, noun
Word Origin
Old English mynet coin, from Latin monēta money, mint, from the temple of Juno Monēta, used as a mint in ancient Rome
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for mintest

mint

n.

aromatic herb, Old English minte (8c.), from West Germanic *minta (cf. Old Saxon minta, M.D. mente, Old High German minza, German Minze), a borrowing from Latin menta, mentha "mint," from Greek minthe, personified as a nymph transformed into an herb by Proserpine, probably a loan-word from a lost Mediterranean language.

place where money is coined, early 15c., from Old English mynet "coin, coinage, money" (8c.), from West Germanic *munita (cf. Old Saxon munita, Old Frisian menote, Middle Dutch munte, Old High German munizza, German münze), from Latin moneta "mint" (see money). Earlier word for "place where money is coined" was minter (early 12c.). General sense of "a vast sum of money" is from 1650s.

v.

"to stamp metal to make coins," 1540s, from mint (n.2). Related: Minted; minting. Minter "one who stamps coins to create money" is from early 12c.

adj.

"perfect" (like a freshly minted coin), 1887 (in mint condition), from mint (n.2).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
mintest in the Bible

(Gr. heduosmon, i.e., "having a sweet smell"), one of the garden herbs of which the Pharisees paid tithes (Matt. 23:23; Luke 11:42). It belongs to the labiate family of plants. The species most common in Syria is the Mentha sylvestris, the wild mint, which grows much larger than the garden mint (M. sativa). It was much used in domestic economy as a condiment, and also as a medicine. The paying of tithes of mint was in accordance with the Mosiac law (Deut. 14:22), but the error of the Pharisees lay in their being more careful about this little matter of the mint than about weightier matters.

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for mint

All English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for mintest

0
0
Scrabble Words With Friends

Nearby words for mintest