mirror

[mir-er]
noun
1.
a reflecting surface, originally of polished metal but now usually of glass with a silvery, metallic, or amalgam backing.
2.
such a surface set into a frame, attached to a handle, etc., for use in viewing oneself or as an ornament.
3.
any reflecting surface, as the surface of calm water under certain lighting conditions.
4.
Optics. a surface that is either plane, concave, or convex and that reflects rays of light.
5.
something that gives a minutely faithful representation, image, or idea of something else: Gershwin's music was a mirror of its time.
6.
a pattern for imitation; exemplar: a man who was the mirror of fashion.
7.
a glass, crystal, or the like, used by magicians, diviners, etc.
verb (used with object)
8.
to reflect in or as if in a mirror.
9.
to reflect as a mirror does.
10.
to mimic or imitate (something) accurately.
11.
to be or give a faithful representation, image, or idea of: Her views on politics mirror mine completely.
adjective
12.
Music. (of a canon or fugue) capable of being played in retrograde or in inversion, as though read in a mirror placed beside or below the music.
Idioms
13.
with mirrors, by or as if by magic.

Origin:
1175–1225; Middle English mirour < Old French mireo(u)r, equivalent to mir- (see mirage) + -eo(u)r < Latin -ātor -ator

mirrorlike, adjective
unmirrored, adjective

mere, mère, mirror.


6. model, epitome, paradigm.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
mirror (ˈmɪrə)
 
n
1.  a surface, such as polished metal or glass coated with a metal film, that reflects light without diffusion and produces an image of an object placed in front of it
2.  such a reflecting surface mounted in a frame
3.  any reflecting surface
4.  a thing that reflects or depicts something else: the press is a mirror of public opinion
 
vb
5.  (tr) to reflect, represent, or depict faithfully: he mirrors his teacher's ideals
 
[C13: from Old French from mirer to look at, from Latin mīrārī to wonder at]
 
'mirror-like
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

mirror
early 13c., from O.Fr. mireor "a reflecting glass," earlier miradoir (11c.), from mirer "look at," from V.L. *mirare, from L. mirari "to wonder at, admire" (see miracle). Fig. usage is attested from c.1300. The verb meaning "to reflect" is first attested 1820 in Keats's
"Lamia." Related: Mirrored; mirroring. Used in divination since classical and biblical times; mirrors in modern England are the subject of at least 14 known superstitions, according to folklorists. Belief that breaking one brings bad luck is attested from 1777.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
mirror   (mĭr'ər)  Pronunciation Key 
An object that causes light or other radiation to be reflected from its surface, with little or no diffusion. Common mirrors consist of a thin sheet or film of metal, such as silver, behind or covering a glass pane. Mirrors are used extensively in telescopes, microscopes, lasers, fiber optics, measuring instruments, and many other devices. See more at reflection.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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FOLDOC
Computing Dictionary

mirroring definition


mirror

The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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Example sentences for mirroring
Mirroring the body language of someone else indicates that they are understood.
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