mitigation

[mit-i-gey-shuhn]
noun
1.
the act of mitigating, or lessening the force or intensity of something unpleasant, as wrath, pain, grief, or extreme circumstances: Social support is the most important factor in the mitigation of stress among adolescents.
2.
the act of making a condition or consequence less severe: the mitigation of a punishment.
3.
the process of becoming milder, gentler, or less severe.
4.
a mitigating circumstance, event, or consequence.

nonmitigation, noun
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
mitigate (ˈmɪtɪˌɡeɪt)
 
vb
to make or become less severe or harsh; moderate
 
[C15: from Latin mītigāre, from mītis mild + agere to make]
 
usage  Mitigate is sometimes wrongly used where militate is meant: his behaviour militates (not mitigates) against his chances of promotion
 
mitigable
 
adj
 
miti'gation
 
n
 
'mitigative
 
adj
 
'mitigatory
 
adj
 
'mitigator
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

mitigation
mid-14c., from L. mitigationem, noun of action from mitigare (see mitigate).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Although that is probably being held down by the federal foreclosure mitigation
  programs.
This is known as “mitigation”—moving or restoring wetlands to
  ensure no net loss, as national legislation requires.
Barrister might have some defense in mitigation of his responsibility.
The company attributed its failure to a lack of ability to market the product's
  purported risk mitigation benefits.
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