mitzvos

mitzvah

[Sephardic Hebrew meets-vah, mits-; English, Ashkenazic Hebrew mits-vuh]
noun, plural mitzvoth, mitzvot, mitzvos [Sephardic Hebrew meets-vawt, mits-; Ashkenazic Hebrew mits-vohs] . English, mitzvahs [mits-vuhz] . Hebrew.
1.
any of the collection of 613 commandments or precepts in the Bible and additional ones of rabbinic origin that relate chiefly to the religious and moral conduct of Jews.
2.
any good or praiseworthy deed.
Also, mitsvah.


Origin:
miṣwāh commandment

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World English Dictionary
mitzvah (ˈmɪtsvə, Hebrew mitsˈvɑ)
 
n , pl -vahs, -voth
1.  a commandment or precept, esp one found in the Bible
2.  a good deed
 
[from Hebrew: commandment]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Word Origin & History

mitzvah
Jewish rabbinical commandment, 1650, from Heb. mitzwah "commandment, precept," from base tziwwah "he commanded," related to Arabic wasa "he bound, united."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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