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mock

[mok] /mɒk/
verb (used with object)
1.
to attack or treat with ridicule, contempt, or derision.
2.
to ridicule by mimicry of action or speech; mimic derisively.
3.
to mimic, imitate, or counterfeit.
4.
to challenge; defy:
His actions mock convention.
5.
to deceive, delude, or disappoint.
verb (used without object)
6.
to use ridicule or derision; scoff; jeer (often followed by at).
noun
7.
a contemptuous or derisive imitative action or speech; mockery or derision.
8.
something mocked or derided; an object of derision.
9.
an imitation; counterfeit; fake.
10.
Shipbuilding.
  1. a hard pattern representing the surface of a plate with a warped form, upon which the plate is beaten to shape after furnacing.
  2. bed (def 23).
adjective
11.
feigned; not real; sham:
a mock battle.
Verb phrases
12.
mock up, to build a mock-up of.
Origin
late Middle English
1400-1450
1400-50; late Middle English mokken < Middle French mocquer
Related forms
mockable, adjective
mocker, noun
mockingly, adverb
self-mocking, adjective
unmocked, adjective
unmocking, adjective
unmockingly, adverb
Synonyms
1. deride; taunt, flout, gibe; chaff, tease. See ridicule. 5. cheat, dupe, fool, mislead.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for mocked
  • The small group that continues to question often gets punished or mocked.
  • No popular game show contestant would be either beaten by the police or mocked on air.
  • It was a little irritating to see my first post mocked with a pointless and flip answer.
  • It was free but super-slow, and his friends mocked him mercilessly.
  • The case and the plaintiff were much mocked in newspaper stories.
  • There are no shortage of ad campaigns that deserve to be mocked.
  • No longer shamed or openly mocked, the left-handed are allowed to coexist with us peacefully.
  • Critics mocked the chaotic launch of that scheme, and feared its huge cost would end up wrecking the budget.
  • The prattling pedlars of positivism deserve to be mocked.
  • The press, ultimately discovered by those it mocked, was destroyed.
British Dictionary definitions for mocked

mock

/mɒk/
verb
1.
when intr, often foll by at. to behave with scorn or contempt (towards); show ridicule (for)
2.
(transitive) to imitate, esp in fun; mimic
3.
(transitive) to deceive, disappoint, or delude
4.
(transitive) to defy or frustrate the team mocked the visitors' attempt to score
noun
5.
the act of mocking
6.
a person or thing mocked
7.
a counterfeit; imitation
8.
(often pl) (informal) (in England and Wales) the school examinations taken as practice before public examinations
adjective (prenominal)
9.
sham or counterfeit
10.
serving as an imitation or substitute, esp for practice purposes a mock battle, mock finals
See also mock-up
Derived Forms
mockable, adjective
mocker, noun
mocking, noun, adjective
mockingly, adverb
Word Origin
C15: from Old French mocquer
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for mocked
mock
mid-15c., from M.Fr. mocquer "deride, jeer," from O.Fr., perhaps from V.L. *muccare "to blow the nose" (as a derisive gesture), from L. mucus; or possibly from M.Du. mocken "to mumble" or M.L.G. mucken "grumble." Related: Mocked; mocking; mockingly. Replaced O.E. bysmerian. Sense of "imitating," as in mockingbird and mock turtle (1763), is from notion of derisive imitation. The adjective is 1540s, from the noun.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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