molts

molt

[mohlt]
verb (used without object)
1.
(of birds, insects, reptiles, etc.) to cast or shed the feathers, skin, or the like, that will be replaced by a new growth.
verb (used with object)
2.
to cast or shed (feathers, skin, etc.) in the process of renewal.
noun
3.
an act, process, or an instance of molting.
4.
something that is dropped in molting.
Also, especially British, moult.


Origin:
1300–50; earlier mout (with intrusive -l-; cf. fault, assault), Middle English mouten, Old English -mūtian to change (in bi-mūtian to exchange for) < Latin mūtāre to change; see mutate

molter, noun
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
molt (məʊlt)
 
vb, —n
the usual US spelling of moult

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

molt
mid-14c., mouten, of feathers, "to be shed," from O.E. (be)mutian "to exchange," from L. mutare "to change" (see mutable). Transitive sense, of birds, "to shed feathers" is first attested 1520s. With parasitic -l-, late 16c., on model of fault, etc. Related: Molting.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

molt (mōlt)
v. molt·ed, molt·ing, molts
To shed periodically part or all of a coat or an outer covering, such as feathers, cuticle, or skin, which is then replaced by a new growth. n.

  1. The act or process of molting.

  2. The material cast off during molting.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
molt   (mōlt)  Pronunciation Key 
To shed an outer covering, such as skin or feathers, for replacement by a new growth. Many snakes, birds, and arthropods molt.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Synonyms
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