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compassion

[kuhm-pash-uhn]
noun
1.
a feeling of deep sympathy and sorrow for another who is stricken by misfortune, accompanied by a strong desire to alleviate the suffering.
verb (used with object)
2.
Archaic. to compassionate.

Origin:
1300–50; Middle English (< Anglo-French) < Late Latin compassiōn- (stem of compassiō). See com-, passion

compassionless, adjective
uncompassion, noun
uncompassioned, adjective


1. commiseration, mercy, tenderness, heart, clemency. See sympathy.


1. mercilessness, indifference.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
compassion (kəmˈpæʃən)
 
n
a feeling of distress and pity for the suffering or misfortune of another, often including the desire to alleviate it
 
[C14: from Old French, from Late Latin compassiō fellow feeling, from compatī to suffer with, from Latin com- with + patī to bear, suffer]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

compassion
mid-14c., from O.Fr. compassion, from L.L. compassionem (nom. compassio) "sympathy," from compassus, pp. of compati "to feel pity," from com- "together" + pati "to suffer" (see passion). Loan-translation of Gk. sympatheia.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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