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cloak

[klohk]
noun
1.
a loose outer garment, as a cape or coat.
2.
something that covers or conceals; disguise; pretense: He conducts his affairs under a cloak of secrecy.
verb (used with object)
3.
to cover with or as if with a cloak: She arrived at the opera cloaked in green velvet.
4.
to hide; conceal: The mission was cloaked in mystery.

Origin:
1175–1225; Middle English cloke (< Old French) < Medieval Latin cloca, variant of clocca bell-shaped cape, bell; see clock1

cloakless, adjective
undercloak, noun
well-cloaked, adjective


2. cover, mask, veil.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
cloak (kləʊk)
 
n
1.  a wraplike outer garment fastened at the throat and falling straight from the shoulders
2.  something that covers or conceals
 
vb
3.  to cover with or as if with a cloak
4.  to hide or disguise
 
[C13: from Old French cloque, from Medieval Latin clocca cloak, bell; referring to the bell-like shape]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

cloak
1293, from O.N.Fr. cloque, from M.L. clocca "travelers' cape," lit. "a bell," so called from the garment's bell-like appearance (see bell). The verb is from 1509. Cloak and dagger (1806) translates Fr. de cape et d'épée. Cloakroom is from 1852.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Cloak definition


an upper garment, "an exterior tunic, wide and long, reaching to the ankles, but without sleeves" (Isa. 59:17). The word so rendered is elsewhere rendered "robe" or "mantle." It was worn by the high priest under the ephod (Ex. 28:31), by kings and others of rank (1 Sam. 15:27; Job 1:20; 2:12), and by women (2 Sam. 13:18). The word translated "cloke", i.e., outer garment, in Matt. 5:40 is in its plural form used of garments in general (Matt. 17:2; 26:65). The cloak mentioned here and in Luke 6:29 was the Greek himation, Latin pallium, and consisted of a large square piece of wollen cloth fastened round the shoulders, like the abba of the Arabs. This could be taken by a creditor (Ex. 22:26,27), but the coat or tunic (Gr. chiton) mentioned in Matt. 5:40 could not. The cloak which Paul "left at Troas" (2 Tim. 4:13) was the Roman paenula, a thick upper garment used chiefly in travelling as a protection from the weather. Some, however, have supposed that what Paul meant was a travelling-bag. In the Syriac version the word used means a bookcase. (See Dress.)

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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