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hinder2

[hahyn-der] /ˈhaɪn dər/
adjective
1.
situated at the rear or back; posterior:
the hinder part of a carcass.
noun
2.
Chiefly Northern and North Midland U.S. the buttocks.
Origin of hinder2
1250-1300
1250-1300; Middle English; compare Old English hinder (adv.) behind; cognate with German hinter (preposition) behind
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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British Dictionary definitions for more-hinder

hinder1

/ˈhɪndə/
verb
1.
to be or get in the way of (someone or something); hamper
2.
(transitive) to prevent
Derived Forms
hinderer, noun
hindering, adjective, noun
Word Origin
Old English hindrian; related to Old Norse hindra, Old High German hintarōn

hinder2

/ˈhaɪndə/
adjective
1.
(prenominal) situated at or further towards the back or rear; posterior: the hinder parts
Word Origin
Old English; related to Old Norse hindri latter, Gothic hindar beyond, Old High German hintar behind
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for more-hinder

hinder

v.

Old English hindrian "to harm, injure, impair, check, repress," from Proto-Germanic *hinderojanan (cf. Old Norse hindra, Dutch hinderen, Old High German hintaron, German hindern "to keep back"), from a root meaning "on that side of, behind" (cf. hind (adj.)); thus the ground sense is "to put or keep back," though this sense in English is recorded only from late 14c. Related: Hindered; hindering.

adj,

"situated in the rear, toward the back," late 14c., probably from Old English hinder (adv.) "behind, back, afterward," but treated as a comparative of hind (adj.). Related to Old High German hintar, German hinter, Gothic hindar "behind." Middle English had hinderhede, literally "hinder-hood; posterity in time, inferiority in rank;" and hinderling "person fallen from moral or social respectability, wretch."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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