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mortify

[mawr-tuh-fahy] /ˈmɔr təˌfaɪ/
verb (used with object), mortified, mortifying.
1.
to humiliate or shame, as by injury to one's pride or self-respect.
2.
to subjugate (the body, passions, etc.) by abstinence, ascetic discipline, or self-inflicted suffering.
3.
Pathology. to affect with gangrene or necrosis.
verb (used without object), mortified, mortifying.
4.
to practice mortification or disciplinary austerities.
5.
Pathology. to undergo mortification; become gangrened or necrosed.
Origin
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English mortifien < Middle French mortifier < Late Latin mortificāre to put to death, equivalent to Latin morti- (stem of mors) death + -ficāre -fy
Related forms
mortifiedly, adverb
mortifier, noun
mortifyingly, adverb
premortify, verb (used with object), premortified, premortifying.
unmortified, adjective
Synonyms
1. humble, abase. 2. subdue, restrain.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for mortified
  • When an overweight high school senior ends up on the list of homecoming queen nominees as a prank, she is mortified.
  • Some undergraduates at the college were mortified upon receiving the message.
  • The over-enthusiastic tagger was mortified and left people alone after that.
  • Shriver was described by friends as mortified by the whole episode and seeking to move quietly beyond it.
  • She was mortified for the whole weekend because her straightened hair appeared to be about a foot longer than her natural hair.
  • Her primary résumé requirement is an ability to look pretty yet mortified.
  • Her poor husband looked mortified over the whole thing, but obviously felt he had to be loyal to her.
  • One of them is mortified at first, but then turns into a heartless killer.
  • After the rapscallion thief races the mortified cowboy, determined to recapture his gun.
  • Nevertheless she was mortified by this public reminder.
British Dictionary definitions for mortified

mortify

/ˈmɔːtɪˌfaɪ/
verb -fies, -fying, -fied
1.
(transitive) to humiliate or cause to feel shame
2.
(transitive) (Christianity) to subdue and bring under control by self-denial, disciplinary exercises, etc
3.
(intransitive) to undergo tissue death or become gangrenous
Derived Forms
mortifier, noun
mortifying, adjective
mortifyingly, adverb
Word Origin
C14: via Old French from Church Latin mortificāre to put to death, from Latin mors death + facere to do
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for mortified
adj.

"deeply humiliated," 1717, past participle adjective from mortify.

mortify

v.

late 14c., "to kill," from Old French mortefiier "destroy, overwhelm, punish," from Late Latin mortificare "cause death, kill, put to death," literally "make dead," from mortificus "producing death," from Latin mors (genitive mortis) "death" (see mortal (adj.)) + root of facere "to make" (see factitious). Religious sense of "to subdue the flesh by abstinence and discipline" first attested early 15c. Sense of "humiliate" first recorded 1690s (cf. mortification). Related: Mortified; mortifying.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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mortified in Medicine

mortify mor·ti·fy (môr'tə-fī')
v. mor·ti·fied, mor·ti·fy·ing, mor·ti·fies
To undergo mortification; to become gangrenous or to necrotize.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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