mouthfuls

mouthful

[mouth-fool]
noun, plural mouthfuls.
1.
the amount a mouth can hold.
2.
the amount taken into the mouth at one time.
3.
a small quantity.
4.
Informal. a spoken remark of great truth, relevance, effectiveness, etc.: You said a mouthful!
5.
a long word or group of words, especially one that is hard to pronounce.

Origin:
1375–1425; late Middle English. See mouth, -ful


See -ful.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
mouthful (ˈmaʊθˌfʊl)
 
n , pl -fuls
1.  as much as is held in the mouth at one time
2.  a small quantity, as of food
3.  a long word or phrase that is difficult to say
4.  informal (Brit) an abusive response
5.  informal chiefly (US), (Canadian) an impressive remark (esp in the phrase say a mouthful)

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

mouthful
"a lot to say," 1748, from mouth + -ful.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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