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movement

[moov-muh nt] /ˈmuv mənt/
noun
1.
the act, process, or result of moving.
2.
a particular manner or style of moving.
3.
Usually, movements. actions or activities, as of a person or a body of persons.
4.
Military, Naval. a change of position or location of troops or ships.
5.
abundance of events or incidents.
6.
rapid progress of events.
7.
the progress of events, as in a narrative or drama.
8.
Fine Arts. the suggestion of motion in a work of art, either by represented gesture in figurative painting or sculpture or by the relationship of structural elements in a design or composition.
9.
a progressive development of ideas toward a particular conclusion:
the movement of his thought.
10.
a series of actions or activities intended or tending toward a particular end:
the movement toward universal suffrage.
11.
the course, tendency, or trend of affairs in a particular field.
12.
a diffusely organized or heterogeneous group of people or organizations tending toward or favoring a generalized common goal:
the antislavery movement; the realistic movement in art.
13.
the price change in the market of some commodity or security:
an upward movement in the price of butter.
15.
the working parts or a distinct portion of the working parts of a mechanism, as of a watch.
16.
Music.
  1. a principal division or section of a sonata, symphony, or the like.
  2. motion; rhythm; time; tempo.
17.
Prosody. rhythmical structure or character.
Origin
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English < Middle French; see move, -ment
Related forms
countermovement, noun
Synonyms
1. See motion. 5. eventfulness.
Antonyms
1. inertia, stasis.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for movements
  • Roads to dominion rightwing movements and political power in the united states.
  • He also included fugal sections in the final movements of his string quartet no.
  • Performers attempt to evade the bull solely through the swiftness of their movements.
  • For example, prolife and prochoice movements are countermovements to each other.
  • This type of bias is often seen with reporting on new religious movements.
  • She would often ask them to describe their movements in scientific terms.
  • You utilize erratic movements to prevent anyone from predicting them.
  • Ecoterrorism radical environmental and animal liberation movements.
  • These movements are not centrally coordinated, since no muscle or nerve tissues exist.
  • Many species have acute vision capable of detecting minute movements.
British Dictionary definitions for movements

movement

/ˈmuːvmənt/
noun
1.
  1. the act, process, or result of moving
  2. an instance of moving
2.
the manner of moving
3.
  1. a group of people with a common ideology, esp a political or religious one
  2. the organized action of such a group
4.
a trend or tendency in a particular sphere
5.
the driving and regulating mechanism of a watch or clock
6.
(often pl) a person's location and activities during a specific time
7.
  1. the evacuation of the bowels
  2. the matter evacuated
8.
(music) a principal self-contained section of a symphony, sonata, etc, usually having its own structure
9.
tempo or pace, as in music or literature
10.
(fine arts) the appearance of motion in painting, sculpture, etc
11.
(prosody) the rhythmic structure of verse
12.
a positional change by one or a number of military units
13.
a change in the market price of a security or commodity
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for movements

movement

n.

late 14c., from Old French movement "movement, exercise; start, instigation" (Modern French mouvement), from Medieval Latin movimentum, from Latin movere (see move (v.)). In the musical sense of "major division of a piece" it is attested from 1776; in the political/social sense, from 1828. Related: Movements.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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movements in Medicine

movement move·ment (mōōv'mənt)
n.

  1. The act or an instance of moving; a change in place or position.

  2. An evacuation of the bowels; defecation.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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movements in Culture

movement definition


In music, a self-contained division of a long work; each movement usually has its own tempo. A long, undivided composition is said to be in one movement.

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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