multiplexors

multiplex

[muhl-tuh-pleks]
adjective
1.
having many parts or aspects: the multiplex problem of drug abuse.
2.
manifold; multiple: the multiplex opportunities in high technology.
3.
Telecommunications. of, pertaining to, or using equipment permitting the simultaneous transmission of two or more trains of signals or messages over a single channel.
verb (used with object)
4.
Telecommunications.
a.
to arrange (a circuit) for use by multiplex telegraphy.
b.
to transmit (two or more signals or messages) by a multiplex system, circuit, or the like.
verb (used without object)
5.
to send several messages or signals simultaneously, as by multiplex telegraphy.
noun
6.
a multiplex electronics system.
7.
(in map making) a stereoscopic device that makes it possible to view pairs of aerial photographs in three dimensions.
8.
Also called multiplex cinema, multiplex theater. a group of two or more motion-picture theaters on the same site or in the same building, especially a cluster of adjoining theaters.

Origin:
1550–60; < Latin; see multi-, -plex

multiplexer, multiplexor, noun
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World English Dictionary
multiplex (ˈmʌltɪˌplɛks)
 
n
1.  telecomm
 a.  the use of a common communications channel for sending two or more messages or signals. In frequency-division multiplex the frequency band transmitted by the common channel is split into narrower bands each of which constitutes a distinct channel. In time-division multiplex different channels are established by intermittent connections to the common channel
 b.  (as modifier): a multiplex transmitter
2.  a.  a purpose-built complex containing a number of cinemas and usually a restaurant or bar
 b.  (as modifier): a multiplex cinema
 
adj
3.  designating a method of map-making using three cameras to produce a stereoscopic effect
4.  a less common word for multiple
 
vb
5.  to send (messages or signals) or (of messages or signals) be sent by multiplex
 
[C16: from Latin: having many folds, from multi- + plicāre to fold]
 
'multiplexer
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin & History

multiplex
1550s, in mathematics, from L. multiplex, from comb. form of multus (see multi-) + plex "fold," from plicare (see ply (v.)).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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