multitudes

multitude

[muhl-ti-tood, -tyood]
noun
1.
a great number; host: a multitude of friends.
2.
a great number of people gathered together; crowd; throng.
3.
the state or character of being many; numerousness.
4.
the multitude, the common people; the masses.

Origin:
1275–1325; Middle English < Latin multitūdō. See multi-, -tude


2. mass. See crowd1.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To multitudes
Collins
World English Dictionary
multitude (ˈmʌltɪˌtjuːd)
 
n
1.  a large gathering of people
2.  the multitude the common people
3.  a large number
4.  the state or quality of being numerous
 
[C14: via Old French from Latin multitūdō]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

multitude
early 14c., from L. multitudimen (nom. multitudo, gen. multitudinis) "a great number, crowd," from multus "many, much" + suffix -tudo. Related: Multitudes; multitudinous.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature
FAVORITES
RECENT

;