muonium

[myoo-oh-nee-uhm]
noun Physics.
an electron and a positively charged muon bound together by electrical attraction in the same manner as the electron and proton in a hydrogen atom.

Origin:
1955–60; mu(on) + -onium, probably extracted from positronium

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muonium

short-lived quasi-atom composed of a positive muon (an antiparticle), as nucleus, and an ordinary negative electron. It is formed when a positive muon captures an atomic electron after being slowed down in matter. Muoniums form a few compounds with gases such as nitrogen dioxide and ethylene. Muonium research throws some light on the puzzling nature of muons (essentially heavy electrons) and their relation to ordinary electrons.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences
He was conducting a laser experiment used to measure the energy levels of muonium, an atom consisting of a muon and an electron.
Helium gas is used to inhibit muonium formation by positive muons.
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