follow Dictionary.com

Today's Word of the Day means...

muzzle

[muhz-uh l] /ˈmʌz əl/
noun
1.
the mouth, or end for discharge, of the barrel of a gun, pistol, etc.
2.
the projecting part of the head of an animal, including jaws, mouth, and nose.
3.
a device, usually an arrangement of straps or wires, placed over an animal's mouth to prevent the animal from biting, eating, etc.
verb (used with object), muzzled, muzzling.
4.
to put a muzzle on (an animal or its mouth) so as to prevent biting, eating, etc.
5.
to restrain from speech, the expression of opinion, etc.:
The censors muzzled the press.
6.
Nautical. to attach the cable to the stock of (an anchor) by means of a light line to permit the anchor to be pulled loose readily.
Origin
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English musel < Middle French < Medieval Latin mūsellum, diminutive of mūsum snout < ?
Synonyms
5. silence, quiet, still, supress.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
British Dictionary definitions for muzzles

muzzle

/ˈmʌzəl/
noun
1.
the projecting part of the face, usually the jaws and nose, of animals such as the dog and horse
2.
a guard or strap fitted over an animal's nose and jaws to prevent it biting or eating
3.
the front end of a gun barrel
verb (transitive)
4.
to prevent from being heard or noticed to muzzle the press
5.
to put a muzzle on (an animal)
6.
to take in (a sail)
Derived Forms
muzzler, noun
Word Origin
C15 mosel, from Old French musel, diminutive of muse snout, from Medieval Latin mūsus, of unknown origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for muzzles
muzzle
late 14c., "device put over an animal's mouth to stop it from biting, eating, or rooting," from O.Fr. musel (12c.), from muse "muzzle," from Gallo-Romance *musa "snout," of unknown origin, possibly related to L. morsus "bite." Meaning "projecting part of the head of an animal" is from c.1410; sense of "open end of a firearm" first recorded 1566. The verb meaning "to put a muzzle on" is first recorded c.1470.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
muzzles in the Bible

Grain in the East is usually thrashed by the sheaves being spread out on a floor, over which oxen and cattle are driven to and fro, till the grain is trodden out. Moses ordained that the ox was not to be muzzled while thrashing. It was to be allowed to eat both the grain and the straw (Deut. 25:4). (See AGRICULTURE.)

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
Cite This Source

Word of The Day

Difficulty index for muzzle

Some English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for muzzles

27
30
Scrabble Words With Friends