myriad

[mir-ee-uhd]
noun
1.
a very great or indefinitely great number of persons or things.
2.
ten thousand.
adjective
3.
of an indefinitely great number; innumerable: the myriad stars of a summer night.
4.
having innumerable phases, aspects, variations, etc.: the myriad mind of Shakespeare.
5.
ten thousand.

Origin:
1545–55; < Greek mȳriad- (stem of mȳriás) ten thousand; see -ad1

myriadly, adverb


4. countless, boundless, infinite, untold.
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World English Dictionary
myriad (ˈmɪrɪəd)
 
adj
1.  innumerable
 
n
2.  (also used in plural) a large indefinite number
3.  archaic ten thousand
 
[C16: via Late Latin from Greek murias ten thousand]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

myriad
1555, from M.Fr. myriade, from L.L. myrias (gen. myriadis) "ten thousand," from Gk. myrias (gen. myriados) "ten thousand," from myrios "innumerable, countless," of unknown origin. Specific use is usually in translations from Gk. or Latin.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
For three weeks, myriad pretty dresses were paraded by myriad ravishing models.
As you said, we can speculate on the myriad situations.
But repeated searches for this myriad population of frosty worlds came up
  empty-handed.
Nor was anybody taken aback by the myriad irregularities on election day.
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