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myriad

[mir-ee-uh d] /ˈmɪr i əd/
noun
1.
a very great or indefinitely great number of persons or things.
2.
ten thousand.
adjective
3.
of an indefinitely great number; innumerable:
the myriad stars of a summer night.
4.
having innumerable phases, aspects, variations, etc.:
the myriad mind of Shakespeare.
5.
ten thousand.
Origin
1545-1555
1545-55; < Greek mȳriad- (stem of mȳriás) ten thousand; see -ad1
Related forms
myriadly, adverb
Synonyms
4. countless, boundless, infinite, untold.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for myriads
  • Three years ago myriads of yearling steelhead home to spawn.
  • Recurring bad dreams may be the results of myriads of links laid down to the same threat.
  • The birds could not survive and myriads of public servants live endlessly off the extinction.
  • In addition, myriads of laws and regulations invade every aspect of the market.
  • Males live shorter lives on average not because of denser hair but due to myriads of other reasons.
  • Our ground state and the low-energy dynamics can have myriads of other kinds of symmetries as well.
  • The problem is not so much in handling single atoms but in discarding myriads of others.
  • Not to mention myriads of other technology that has made the battlefield a place where less boots on the ground are required.
  • Our immune system is a wonderful thing, having evolved over millions of years to protect us from myriads of diseases.
  • Up and down and by and between these rails, they swarm and dart and fly in countless myriads.
British Dictionary definitions for myriads

myriad

/ˈmɪrɪəd/
adjective
1.
innumerable
noun
2.
(also used in pl) a large indefinite number
3.
(archaic) ten thousand
Word Origin
C16: via Late Latin from Greek murias ten thousand
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for myriads

myriad

n.

1550s, from Middle French myriade and directly from Late Latin myrias (genitive myriadis) "ten thousand," from Greek myrias (genitive myriados) "a number of ten thousand, countless numbers," from myrios (plural myrioi) "innumerable, countless, infinite; boundless," as a definite number, "ten thousand" ("the greatest number in Greek expressed by one word," Liddell & Scott say), of unknown origin; perhaps from PIE *meue- "abundant" (cf. Hittite muri- "cluster of grapes," Latin muto "penis," Middle Irish moth "penis"). Specific use is usually in translations from Greek or Latin.

adj.

c.1800, from myriad (n.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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