myriad

[mir-ee-uhd]
noun
1.
a very great or indefinitely great number of persons or things.
2.
ten thousand.
adjective
3.
of an indefinitely great number; innumerable: the myriad stars of a summer night.
4.
having innumerable phases, aspects, variations, etc.: the myriad mind of Shakespeare.
5.
ten thousand.

Origin:
1545–55; < Greek mȳriad- (stem of mȳriás) ten thousand; see -ad1

myriadly, adverb


4. countless, boundless, infinite, untold.
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World English Dictionary
myriad (ˈmɪrɪəd)
 
adj
1.  innumerable
 
n
2.  (also used in plural) a large indefinite number
3.  archaic ten thousand
 
[C16: via Late Latin from Greek murias ten thousand]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

myriad
1555, from M.Fr. myriade, from L.L. myrias (gen. myriadis) "ten thousand," from Gk. myrias (gen. myriados) "ten thousand," from myrios "innumerable, countless," of unknown origin. Specific use is usually in translations from Gk. or Latin.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Three years ago myriads of yearling steelhead home to spawn.
Recurring bad dreams may be the results of myriads of links laid down to the
  same threat.
The birds could not survive and myriads of public servants live endlessly off
  the extinction.
In addition, myriads of laws and regulations invade every aspect of the market.
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