NAPKINS

napkin

[nap-kin]
noun
1.
a small piece of cloth or paper, usually square, for use in wiping the lips and fingers and to protect the clothes while eating.
3.
Chiefly British. a diaper.
4.
Scot. and North England. a handkerchief.
5.
Scot. a kerchief or neckerchief.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English, equivalent to nape tablecloth (< Middle French nappe < Latin mappa napkin) + -kin; cf. map

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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
napkin (ˈnæpkɪn)
 
n
1.  Also called: table napkin a usually square piece of cloth or paper used while eating to protect the clothes, wipe the mouth, etc; serviette
2.  rare a similar piece of cloth used for example as a handkerchief or headscarf
3.  a more formal name for nappy
4.  a less common term for sanitary towel
 
[C15: from Old French, from nape tablecloth, from Latin mappa small cloth, towel; see map]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

napkin
1420, from O.Fr. nappe "tablecloth" (from L. mappa, see map) + M.E. -kin "little."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Napkin definition


(Gr. soudarion, John 11:44; 20:7; Lat. sudarium, a "sweat-cloth"), a cloth for wiping the sweat from the face. But the word is used of a wrapper to fold money in (Luke 19:20), and as an article of dress, a "handkerchief" worn on the head (Acts 19:12).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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