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near

[neer] /nɪər/
adverb, nearer, nearest.
1.
close; to a point or place not far away:
Come near so I won't have to shout.
2.
at, within, or to a short distance.
3.
close in time:
The New Year draws near.
4.
close in relation; closely with respect to connection, similarity, intimacy, etc. (often used in combination):
a near-standing position.
5.
all but; almost; nearly:
a period of near 30 years.
6.
Nautical. close to the wind.
7.
Archaic. in a thrifty or stingy manner.
adjective, nearer, nearest.
8.
being close by; not distant:
the near fields.
9.
being the lesser in distance:
the near side.
10.
short or direct:
the near road.
11.
close in time:
the near future.
12.
closely related or connected:
our nearest relatives.
13.
close to an original:
a near translation.
14.
closely affecting one's interests or feelings:
a matter of near consequence to one.
15.
intimate or familiar:
a near friend.
16.
narrow or close:
a near escape.
17.
thrifty or stingy:
near with one's pocketbook.
18.
(of two draft animals hitched together) being on the driver's left (as opposed to off):
The near horse is going lame.
preposition
19.
at, to, or within a short distance, or no great distance, from or of:
regions near the equator.
20.
close to in time:
near the beginning of the year.
21.
close to a condition or state:
He is near death.
verb (used with or without object)
22.
to come or draw near; approach:
The boat neared the dock. Storm clouds neared.
Idioms
23.
near at hand,
  1. in the immediate vicinity:
    There is a shopping area near at hand.
  2. in the near future; soon:
    The departure is near at hand.
Origin of near
900
before 900; Middle English nere, Old English nēar, comparative of nēah nigh
Related forms
nearness, noun
overnear, adjective, adverb
overnearness, noun
Synonyms
11. imminent, impending, approaching. 17. tight, miserly.
Antonyms
1, 2, 8–11, 18. far. 17. generous.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2016.
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Examples from the Web for nearness
Historical Examples
  • Proximity, like familiarity, "breeds contempt;" and the proper cure for the illusions of distance is nearness.

  • Then his eyes rested on Meryl, and all his pulses throbbed with her nearness.

    The Rhodesian Gertrude Page
  • But they were powerful swimmers, and, but for the nearness of the rapids, they could have afforded to laugh at their mishap.

    The Hunters of the Ozark Edward S. Ellis
  • Perhaps she was thinking of her nearness to death in the inlet.

    A Young Man in a Hurry Robert W. Chambers
  • This romantic panorama makes you quite oblivious of the nearness of the noisy, bustling Kaiserstadt.

    Frederic Chopin, Vol II (of 2) Moritz Karasowski
  • For the moment she forgot all fears in his nearness and the sweet pressure of his hand.

    The Clansman Thomas Dixon
  • I shall not hear any word from your lips, but I shall have a deeper sense of your nearness to me than speech can give.

    Over the Teacups Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.
  • Which demonstrates the ever nearness of pathos to humour, of the absurd to the pathetic.

    Gilbert Keith Chesterton Patrick Braybrooke
  • It gave her enormous satisfaction at once to think of danger and to feel so safe because of his nearness.

    The Forgotten Planet Murray Leinster
  • He was filled with happiness at his nearness to the Emperor.

    War and Peace Leo Tolstoy
British Dictionary definitions for nearness

near

/nɪə/
preposition
1.
at or to a place or time not far away from; close to
adverb
2.
at or to a place or time not far away; close by
3.
near to, not far from; near
4.
short for nearly I was damn near killed
adjective
5.
at or in a place not far away
6.
(postpositive) not far away in time; imminent: departure time was near
7.
(prenominal) only just successful or only just failing: a near escape
8.
(postpositive) (informal) miserly, mean
9.
(prenominal) closely connected or intimate: a near relation
verb
10.
to come or draw close (to)
noun
11.
Also called nearside
  1. the left side of a horse, team of animals, vehicle, etc
  2. (as modifier): the near foreleg
Derived Forms
nearness, noun
Word Origin
Old English nēar (adv), comparative of nēah close, nigh; related to Old Frisian niār, Old Norse nǣr, Old High German nāhōr
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for nearness

near

adv.

Old English near "closer, nearer," comparative of neah, neh"nigh." Influenced by Old Norse naer "near," it came to be used as a positive form mid-13c., and new comparative nearer developed 1500s (see nigh). As an adjective from c.1300. Originally an adverb but now supplanted in most such senses by nearly; it has in turn supplanted correct nigh as an adjective. Related: Nearness. In near and dear (1620s) it refers to nearness of kinship. Near East first attested 1891, in Kipling. Near beer "low-alcoholic brew" is from 1908.

v.

"to draw near," 1510s, from near (adv.). Related: Neared; nearing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Idioms and Phrases with nearness
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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