nefarious

[ni-fair-ee-uhs]
adjective
extremely wicked or villainous; iniquitous: a nefarious plot.

Origin:
1595–1605; < Latin nefārius wicked, vile, equivalent to nefās offense against divine or moral law (ne- negative prefix + fās law, right) + -ius -ious, with intervocalic s > r

nefariously, adverb
nefariousness, noun
unnefarious, adjective
unnefariously, adverb
unnefariousness, noun


flagitious, heinous, infamous; vile, atrocious, execrable.


good, honest.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
nefarious (nɪˈfɛərɪəs)
 
adj
evil; wicked; sinful
 
[C17: from Latin nefārius, from nefās unlawful deed, from not + fās divine law]
 
ne'fariously
 
adv
 
ne'fariousness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Word Origin & History

nefarious
1604, from L. nefarius "wicked, abominable," from nefas "crime, wrong, impiety," from ne- "not" (see un-) + fas "right, lawful, divinely spoken," related to fari "to speak" (see fame).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Working with the newspaper and police, they squelched the nefarious goings-on
  in just two months.
There was nothing nefarious about the guy.
But these devices can also be used for nefarious purposes.
Eventually he and Nina join forces to uncover some nefarious secrets.
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