neighbor

[ney-ber]
noun
1.
a person who lives near another.
2.
a person or thing that is near another.
3.
one's fellow human being: to be generous toward one's less fortunate neighbors.
4.
a person who shows kindliness or helpfulness toward his or her fellow humans: to be a neighbor to someone in distress.
5.
(used as a term of address, especially as a friendly greeting to a stranger): Tell me, neighbor, which way to town?
adjective
6.
situated or living near another: one of our neighbor nations.
verb (used with object)
7.
to live or be situated near to; adjoin; border on.
8.
to place or bring near.
verb (used without object)
9.
to live or be situated nearby.
10.
to associate with or as if with one's neighbors; be neighborly or friendly (often followed by with ).
Also, especially British, neighbour.


Origin:
before 900; Middle English; Old English neahgebūr, nēahbūr (nēah nigh + (ge)būr farmer; see Boer, boor); akin to Dutch nabuur, German Nachbar, Old Norse nābūi

neighborless, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
neighbour or neighbor (ˈneɪbə)
 
n
1.  a person who lives near or next to another
2.  a.  a person or thing near or next to another
 b.  (as modifier): neighbour states
 
vb (when intr, often foll by on)
3.  to be or live close (to a person or thing)
 
[Old English nēahbūr, from nēahnigh + būr, gebūr dweller; see boor]
 
neighbor or neighbor
 
n
 
vb
 
[Old English nēahbūr, from nēahnigh + būr, gebūr dweller; see boor]
 
'neighbouring or neighbor
 
adj
 
'neighboring or neighbor
 
adj
 
'neighbourless or neighbor
 
adj
 
'neighborless or neighbor
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

neighbor
O.E. neahgebur (W.Saxon), nehebur (Anglian), from neah "near" (see nigh) + gebur "dweller," related to bur "dwelling" (see bower). Common Gmc. compound (cf. Du. (na)bur, O.H.G. nahgibur, M.H.G. nachgebur, Ger. Nachbar). The verb is first attested in 1586.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
On a computer, they've positioned the turbines close enough together that as
  one spins, it then directs the wind to its neighbor.
And one orchid species uses different fungi than a close orchid neighbor, to
  prevent competing for the same nutrients.
It's close in that it's our next-door neighbor and shares a long border with
  our country.
But my front door was silent and I could think of no reason, logical or
  otherwise, to refuse my neighbor's invitation.
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