neologism

[nee-ol-uh-jiz-uhm]
noun
1.
a new word, meaning, usage, or phrase.
2.
the introduction or use of new words or new senses of existing words.
3.
a new doctrine, especially a new interpretation of sacred writings.
4.
Psychiatry. a new word, often consisting of a combination of other words, that is understood only by the speaker: occurring most often in the speech of schizophrenics.

Origin:
1790–1800; < French néologisme. See neology, -ism

neologist, noun
neologistic, neologistical, adjective
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
neologism or neology (nɪˈɒləˌdʒɪzəm)
 
n , pl -gisms, -gies
1.  a newly coined word, or a phrase or familiar word used in a new sense
2.  the practice of using or introducing neologisms
3.  rare a tendency towards adopting new views, esp rationalist views, in matters of religion
 
[C18: via French from neo- + -logism, from Greek logos word, saying]
 
neology or neology
 
n
 
[C18: via French from neo- + -logism, from Greek logos word, saying]
 
ne'ologist or neology
 
n
 
neolo'gistic or neology
 
adj
 
neolo'gistical or neology
 
adj
 
neological or neology
 
adj
 
neolo'gistically or neology
 
adv
 
neo'logically or neology
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

neologism
"practice of innovation in language," 1800, from Fr. néologisme, from neo- + logos "word." Meaning "new word or expression" is from 1803. Neological is attested from 1754.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

neologism ne·ol·o·gism (nē-ŏl'ə-jĭz'əm)
n.
A meaningless word used by a psychotic.


ne·ol'o·gis'tic or ne·ol'o·gis'ti·cal adj.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Example sentences
We humans are creative about producing neologisms to delineate new worldviews or concepts.
The books are dry, full of scientific neologisms, but extremely funny and thought-provoking.
The words in it are chiefly neologisms, e g, airplane.
Jargon and neologisms do not change the reality of aging, or of anything else.
Synonyms
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