News-peak

newspeak

[noo-speek, nyoo-]
noun
(sometimes initial capital letter) an official or semiofficial style of writing or saying one thing in the guise of its opposite, especially in order to serve a political or ideological cause while pretending to be objective, as in referring to “increased taxation” as “revenue enhancement.”

Origin:
new + speak, coined by George Orwell in his novel, 1984 (1949)

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Collins
World English Dictionary
newspeak (ˈnjuːˌspiːk)
 
n
the language of bureaucrats and politicians, regarded as deliberately ambiguous and misleading
 
[C20: from 1984, a novel by George Orwell]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

Newspeak
"artificial language of official communication in George Orwell's novel 'Nineteen Eighty-Four,' " 1949, from new + speak. Frequently applied to propagandistic warped English.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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