nices

Nice

[nees]
noun
a port in and the capital of Alpes-Maritimes, in SE France, on the Mediterranean: resort.
nice, Nice.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
nice (naɪs)
 
adj
1.  pleasant or commendable: a nice day
2.  kind or friendly: a nice gesture of help
3.  good or satisfactory: they made a nice job of it
4.  subtle, delicate, or discriminating: a nice point in the argument
5.  precise; skilful: a nice fit
6.  rare fastidious; respectable: he was not too nice about his methods
7.  obsolete
 a.  foolish or ignorant
 b.  delicate
 c.  shy; modest
 d.  wanton
8.  nice and pleasingly: it's nice and cool
 
[C13 (originally: foolish): from Old French nice simple, silly, from Latin nescius ignorant, from nescīre to be ignorant; see nescience]
 
'nicely
 
adv
 
'niceness
 
n
 
'nicish
 
adj

Nice (French nis)
 
n
a city in SE France, on the Mediterranean: a leading resort of the French Riviera; founded by Phocaeans from Marseille in about the 3rd century bc. Pop: 342 738 (1999)

NICE (naɪs)
 
n acronym for
(in Britain) National Institute for Clinical Excellence: a body established in 1999 to provide authoritative guidance on current best practice in medicine and to promote high-quality cost-effective medical treatment in the NHS

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

nice
late 13c., "foolish, stupid, senseless," from O.Fr. nice "silly, foolish," from L. nescius "ignorant," lit. "not-knowing," from ne- "not" (see un-) + stem of scire "to know." "The sense development has been extraordinary, even for an adj." [Weekley] -- from "timid" (pre-1300);
to "fussy, fastidious" (late 14c.); to "dainty, delicate" (c.1400); to "precise, careful" (1500s, preserved in such terms as a nice distinction and nice and early); to "agreeable, delightful" (1769); to "kind, thoughtful" (1830). In 16c.-17c. it is often difficult to determine exactly what is meant when a writer uses this word. By 1926, it was pronounced "too great a favorite with the ladies, who have charmed out of it all its individuality and converted it into a mere diffuser of vague and mild agreeableness." [Fowler]
"I am sure," cried Catherine, "I did not mean to say anything wrong; but it is a nice book, and why should I not call it so?" "Very true," said Henry, "and this is a very nice day, and we are taking a very nice walk; and you are two very nice young ladies. Oh! It is a very nice word indeed! It does for everything." [Jane Austen, "Northanger Abbey"]
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary
Nice [(nees)]

City in southeastern France on the Mediterranean Sea.

Note: Nice is the most famous resort of the French Riviera.
The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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American Heritage
Abbreviations & Acronyms
NICE
National Institute for Consumer Education
The American Heritage® Abbreviations Dictionary, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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