nodule

[noj-ool]
noun
1.
a small node, knot, or knob.
2.
a small, rounded mass or lump.
3.
Botany. a tubercle.

Origin:
1590–1600; < Latin nōdulus a little knot, equivalent to nōd(us) node + -ulus -ule

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
nodule (ˈnɒdjuːl)
 
n
1.  a small knot, lump, or node
2.  Also called: root nodule any of the knoblike outgrowths on the roots of clover and many other legumes: contain bacteria involved in nitrogen fixation
3.  anatomy any small node or knoblike protuberance
4.  a small rounded lump of rock or mineral substance, esp in a matrix of different rock material
 
[C17: from Latin nōdulus, from nōdus knot]
 
'nodular
 
adj
 
'nodulose
 
adj
 
'nodulous
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

nodule
1600, from L. nodulus "small knot," dim. of nodus "knot."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

nodule nod·ule (nŏj'ōōl)
n.

  1. A small node.

  2. A small mass of tissue or aggregation of cells.


nod'u·lar (nŏj'ə-lər) or nod'u·lose' (-lōs') or nod'u·lous (-ləs) adj.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
nodule   (nŏj'l)  Pronunciation Key 
  1. A small, usually hard mass of tissue in the body.

  2. A small, knoblike outgrowth found on the roots of many legumes, such as alfalfa, beans, and peas. Nodules grow after the roots have been infected with nitrogen-fixing bacteria of the genus Rhizobium. See more at legume.

  3. A small, rounded lump of a mineral or mixture of minerals that is distinct from and usually harder than the surrounding rock or sediment. Nodules often form by replacement of a small part of the rocks in which they form.


The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Example sentences
But despite millions of dollars of investment, the commercial extraction of
  manganese nodules never became reality.
During such an infection, inflamed nodules within the membranes create pressure
  on the bone surface, leaving the lesions.
Little nodules of calcium form in this gland and then go to the gizzard and
  help grind up food.
From afar, it is a single block of plastic with nodules on the top.
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