non frosted

frosted

[fraw-stid, fros-tid]
adjective
1.
covered with or having frost.
2.
made frostlike in appearance, as certain translucent glass: a frosted window; a frosted light bulb.
3.
coated or decorated with frosting or icing, as a cake.
4.
(of hair) highlighted, especially by bleaching selected strands.
5.
made with ice cream: frosted malted.
noun
7.
a thick beverage, usually made with milk, flavoring syrup, and ice cream whipped together.

Origin:
1635–45; frost + -ed2

nonfrosted, adjective
unfrosted, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
frosted (ˈfrɒstɪd)
 
adj
1.  covered or injured by frost
2.  covered with icing, as a cake
3.  (of glass, etc) having a surface roughened, as if covered with frost, to prevent clear vision through it

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

frost
O.E. forst, frost "a freezing, becoming frozen, extreme cold," from P.Gmc. *frusta- (cf. O.H.G. frost, Du. vorst), related to freosan "to freeze."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

frost (frôst)
n.
A deposit of minute ice crystals formed when water vapor condenses at a temperature below freezing.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
frost   (frôst)  Pronunciation Key 
A deposit of tiny, white ice crystals on a surface. Frost forms through sublimation, when water vapor in the air condenses at a temperature below freezing. It gets its white color from tiny air bubbles trapped in the ice crystals. See more at dew point.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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