non shipping

shipping

[ship-ing]
noun
1.
the act or business of a person or thing that ships.
2.
a number of ships, especially merchant ships, taken as a whole; tonnage.
3.
Obsolete. a voyage.

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English; see ship, -ing1

nonshipping, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
shipping (ˈʃɪpɪŋ)
 
n
1.  a.  the business of transporting freight, esp by ship
 b.  (as modifier): a shipping magnate; shipping line
2.  a.  ships collectively: there is a lot of shipping in the Channel
 b.  the tonnage of a number of ships: shipping for this year exceeded that of last

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

ship
O.E. scip "ship, boat," from P.Gmc. *skipan (cf. O.N., O.S., Goth. skip, Dan. skib, Swed. skepp, M.Du. scip, Du. schip, O.H.G. skif, Ger. Schiff), perhaps originally "tree cut out or hollowed out," and derived from PIE base *skei- "to cut, split." The O.E. word was used for small craft as well; in 19c.,
distinct from a boat in having a bowsprit and three masts, each with a lower, top, and topgallant mast. Fr. esquif, It. schifo are Gmc. loan-words. Ship-board "side of a ship" is from c.1200. Ship-shape "properly arranged" first attested 1644. Phrase ships that pass in the night is from Longfellow's poem "Aftermath" (1873). Phrase runs a tight ship is attested from 1971.

ship
c.1300, "to send or transport by ship," from ship (n.). Transf. to other means of conveyance (railroad, etc.) from 1857, originally Amer.Eng. Shipment "that which is shipped" is from 1861.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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