non withdrawable

withdraw

[with-draw, with-]
verb (used with object), withdrew, withdrawn, withdrawing.
1.
to draw back, away, or aside; take back; remove: She withdrew her hand from his. He withdrew his savings from the bank.
2.
to retract or recall: to withdraw an untrue charge.
3.
to cause (a person) to undergo withdrawal from addiction to a substance.
verb (used without object), withdrew, withdrawn, withdrawing.
4.
to go or move back, away, or aside; retire; retreat: to withdraw from the room.
5.
to remove oneself from some activity, competition, etc.: He withdrew before I could nominate him.
6.
to cease using or consuming an addictive narcotic (followed by from ): to withdraw from heroin.
7.
Parliamentary Procedure. to remove an amendment, motion, etc., from consideration.

Origin:
1175–1225; Middle English withdrawen. See with-, draw

withdrawable, adjective
withdrawer, noun
withdrawingness, noun
nonwithdrawable, adjective
unwithdrawable, adjective
unwithdrawing, adjective


2. revoke, rescind, disavow. 4. See depart.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
withdraw (wɪðˈdrɔː)
 
vb (often foll by from) , -draws, -drawing, -drew, -drawn
1.  (tr) to take or draw back or away; remove
2.  (tr) to remove from deposit or investment in a bank, building society, etc
3.  (tr) to retract or recall (a statement, promise, etc)
4.  (intr) to retire or retreat: the troops withdrew
5.  to back out (of) or depart (from): he withdrew from public life
6.  (intr) to detach oneself socially, emotionally, or mentally
 
[C13: from with (in the sense: away from) + draw]
 
with'drawable
 
adj
 
with'drawer
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

withdraw
early 13c., "to take back," from with "away" + drawen "to draw," possibly a loan-translation of L. retrahere "to retract." Sense of "to remove oneself" is recorded from c.1300.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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