non-appropriative

appropriate

[adj. uh-proh-pree-it; v. uh-proh-pree-eyt]
adjective
1.
suitable or fitting for a particular purpose, person, occasion, etc.: an appropriate example; an appropriate dress.
2.
belonging to or peculiar to a person; proper: Each played his appropriate part.
verb (used with object), appropriated, appropriating.
3.
to set apart, authorize, or legislate for some specific purpose or use: The legislature appropriated funds for the university.
4.
to take to or for oneself; take possession of.
5.
to take without permission or consent; seize; expropriate: He appropriated the trust funds for himself.
6.
to steal, especially to commit petty theft.

Origin:
1515–25; < Late Latin appropriātus made one's own (past participle of appropriāre), equivalent to Latin ap- ap-1 + propri(us) one's own + -ātus -ate1

appropriately, adverb
appropriateness, noun
appropriative [uh-proh-pree-ey-tiv, -uh-tiv] , adjective
appropriativeness, noun
appropriator, noun
nonappropriative, adjective
quasi-appropriate, adjective
quasi-appropriately, adverb
reappropriate, verb (used with object), reappropriated, reappropriating.
well-appropriated, adjective

appropriate, apropos, expropriate.


1. befitting, apt, meet, felicitous, suited, proper, due, becoming, pertinent. 3. apportion, allocate, assign.


1. unsuitable, inept.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
appropriate
 
adj
1.  right or suitable; fitting
2.  rare particular; own: they had their appropriate methods
 
vb
3.  to take for one's own use, esp illegally or without permission
4.  to put aside (funds, etc) for a particular purpose or person
 
[C15: from Late Latin appropriāre to make one's own, from Latin proprius one's own; see proper]
 
ap'propriable
 
adj
 
ap'propriately
 
adv
 
ap'propriateness
 
n
 
ap'propriative
 
adj
 
ap'propriator
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

appropriate
1520s, from L.L. appropriatus, pp. of appropriare, adpropriare (c.450) "to make one's own," from L. ad- "to" + propriare "take as one's own," from proprius "one's own" (see proper). Adj. sense of "specially suitable, proper" is from 1540s.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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