NON-FLAGRANT

flagrant

[fley-gruhnt]
adjective
1.
shockingly noticeable or evident; obvious; glaring: a flagrant error.
2.
notorious; scandalous: a flagrant crime; a flagrant offender.
3.
Archaic. blazing, burning, or glowing.

Origin:
1400–50; late Middle English < Latin flagrant- (stem of flagrāns), present participle of flagrāre to burn; see -ant

flagrancy, flagrance, flagrantness, noun
flagrantly, adverb
nonflagrance, noun
nonflagrancy, noun
nonflagrant, adjective
nonflagrantly, adverb
unflagrant, adjective
unflagrantly, adverb

1. blatant, flagrant (see synonym study at the current entry) ; 2. flagrant, fragrant.


2. disgraceful, monstrous, egregious. Flagrant, glaring, gross, outrageous, rank are adjectives suggesting extreme offensiveness. Flagrant with a root sense of flaming or flaring, suggests evil or immorality so evident that it cannot be ignored or overlooked: a flagrant violation of the law. Glaring meaning “shining brightly,” is similar to flagrant in emphasizing conspicuousness but usually lacks the imputation of immorality: a glaring error in computing the interest. Gross which basically signifies excessive size, is even more negative in implication than the foregoing two terms, suggesting a mistake or impropriety of major proportions: a gross miscarriage of justice. Outrageous describes acts so far beyond the limits of decent behavior or accepted standards as to be totally insupportable: an outrageous abuse of the public trust. Rank with its suggestion of bad odor, describes open offensiveness of the most objectionable kind, inviting total and unalloyed disapprobation: rank dishonesty, stinking to high heaven; Only rank stupidity would countenance such a step.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
flagrant (ˈfleɪɡrənt)
 
adj
1.  openly outrageous
2.  obsolete burning or blazing
 
[C15: from Latin flagrāre to blaze, burn]
 
'flagrancy
 
n
 
'flagrance
 
n
 
'flagrantness
 
n
 
'flagrantly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

flagrant
c.1500, "resplendent," from L. flagrantem (nom. flagrans) "burning," prp. of flagrare "to burn," from L. root *flag-, corresponding to PIE *bhleg- "to shine, flash, burn" (cf. Gk. phlegein "to burn, scorch"), from base *bhel- (1) (see bleach). Sense of "glaringly offensive"
first recorded 1706, probably from common legalese phrase in flagrante delicto "red-handed," lit. "with the crime still blazing." Related: Flagrantly.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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