non-initiate

initiate

[v. ih-nish-ee-eyt; adj., n. ih-nish-ee-it, -eyt]
verb (used with object), initiated, initiating.
1.
to begin, set going, or originate: to initiate major social reforms.
2.
to introduce into the knowledge of some art or subject.
3.
to admit or accept with formal rites into an organization or group, secret knowledge, adult society, etc.
4.
to propose (a measure) by initiative procedure: to initiate a constitutional amendment.
adjective
5.
initiated; begun.
6.
admitted into an organizaton or group, secret knowledge, etc.
7.
introduced to the knowledge of a subject.
noun
8.
a person who has been initiated.

Origin:
1595–1605; < Latin initiātus past participle of initiāre, equivalent to initi(um) (see initial) + -ātus -ate1

initiator, noun
noninitiate, noun
preinitiate, verb (used with object), preinitiated, preinitiating.
preinitiate, noun
quasi-initiated, adjective
reinitiate, verb (used with object), reinitiated, reinitiating.
uninitiate, adjective
uninitiated, adjective
well-initiated, adjective


1. commence; introduce, inaugurate, open. See begin. 2. teach, instruct, indoctrinate, train.


1. conclude.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
initiate
 
vb
1.  to begin or originate
2.  to accept (new members) into an organization such as a club, through often secret ceremonies
3.  to teach fundamentals to: she initiated him into the ballet
 
adj
4.  initiated; begun
 
n
5.  a person who has been initiated, esp recently
6.  a beginner; novice
 
[C17: from Latin initiāre (vb), from initium; see initial]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

initiate
"one who has been initiated," 1811, from pp. adj. initiate (c.1600); see initiate (v.).

initiate
c.1600, from L. initiatus, pp. of initiare, from initium "beginning" (see initial).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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