non-possessive

possessive

[puh-zes-iv]
adjective
1.
jealously opposed to the personal independence of, or to any influence other than one's own upon, a child, spouse, etc.
2.
desirous of possessing, especially excessively so: Young children are so possessive they will not allow others to play with their toys; a possessive lover.
3.
of or pertaining to possession or ownership.
4.
Grammar.
a.
indicating possession, ownership, origin, etc. His in his book is a possessive adjective. His in The book is his is a possessive pronoun.
b.
noting or pertaining to a case that indicates possession, ownership, origin, etc., as, in English, John's in John's hat.
noun Grammar.
5.
the possessive case.
6.
a form in the possessive.

Origin:
1520–30; < Latin possessīvus. See possess, -ive

possessively, adverb
possessiveness, noun
nonpossessive, adjective
nonpossessively, adverb
nonpossessiveness, noun
unpossessive, adjective
unpossessively, adverb
unpossessiveness, noun

possessive, possessory.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
possessive (pəˈzɛsɪv)
 
adj
1.  of or relating to possession or ownership
2.  having or showing an excessive desire to possess, control, or dominate: a possessive mother
3.  grammar
 a.  another word for genitive
 b.  denoting an inflected form of a noun or pronoun used to convey the idea of possession, association, etc, as my or Harry's
 
n
4.  grammar
 a.  the possessive case
 b.  a word or speech element in the possessive case
 
pos'sessively
 
adv
 
pos'sessiveness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary

possessive definition


The case of a noun or pronoun that shows possession. Nouns are usually made possessive by adding an apostrophe and s: “The bicycle is Sue's, not Mark's.” Possessive pronouns can take the place of possessive nouns: “The bicycle is hers, not his.” (See nominative case and objective case.)

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
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