nonplanetary

planetary

[plan-i-ter-ee]
adjective
1.
of, pertaining to, or resembling a planet or the planets.
2.
wandering; erratic.
3.
terrestrial; global.
4.
Machinery. noting or pertaining to an epicyclic gear train in which a sun gear is linked to one or more planet gears also engaging with an encircling ring gear.
noun
5.
Machinery. a planetary gear train.

Origin:
1585–95; < Latin planētārius. See planet, -ary

nonplanetary, adjective

planetary, plenary, plentiful, plenitude.
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World English Dictionary
planetary (ˈplænɪtərɪ, -trɪ)
 
adj
1.  of or relating to a planet
2.  mundane; terrestrial
3.  wandering or erratic
4.  astrology under the influence of one of the planets
5.  (of a gear, esp an epicyclic gear) having an axis that rotates around that of another gear
6.  (of an electron) having an orbit around the nucleus of an atom
 
n , -taries
7.  a train of planetary gears

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
planet  [%PREMIUM_LINK%]     (plān'ĭt)  Pronunciation Key 
A large celestial body, smaller than a star but larger than an asteroid, that does not produce its own light but is illuminated by light from the star around which it revolves. In our solar system there are nine known planets: Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto. Because of Pluto's small size—about two-thirds the diameter of Earth's moon—and its unusual orbit, many astronomers believe it should actually be classed as a Kuiper belt object rather than a planet. A planetlike body with more than about ten times the mass of Jupiter would be considered a brown dwarf rather than a planet. See also extrasolar planet, inner planet, outer planet.

planetary adjective
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