nonsailor

sailor

[sey-ler]
noun
1.
a person whose occupation is sailing or navigation; mariner.
2.
a seaman below the rank of officer.
3.
a naval enlistee.
4.
a person adept at sailing, especially with reference to freedom from seasickness: He was such a bad sailor that he always traveled to Europe by plane.
5.
a flat-brimmed straw hat with a low, flat crown.

Origin:
1540–50; earlier sailer; see sail, -or2

sailorlike, adjective
sailorly, adjective
nonsailor, noun

sailer, sailor (see synonym study at the current entry).


1. seafarer. Sailor, mariner, salt, seaman, tar are terms for a person who leads a seafaring life. A sailor or seaman is one whose occupation is on board a ship at sea, especially a member of a ship's crew below the rank of petty officer: a sailor before the mast; an able-bodied seaman. Mariner is a term now found only in certain technical expressions: master mariner (captain in merchant service); mariner's compass (ordinary compass as used on ships); formerly used much as “sailor” or “seafaring man,” now the word seems elevated or quaint: Rime of the Ancient Mariner. Salt and tar are informal terms for old and experienced sailors: an old salt; a jolly tar.


1. landlubber.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
sailor (ˈseɪlə)
 
n
1.  any member of a ship's crew, esp one below the rank of officer
2.  a person who sails, esp with reference to the likelihood of his becoming seasick: a good sailor
3.  sailor hat short for sailor suit
 
'sailorly
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

sailor
c.1400, sailer, from sail (v.) (see sail (n.)). Spelling with -o- emerged c.1500, probably by influence of tailor, etc., to distinguish the meaning "seaman, mariner" from "thing that sails." It replaced much older seaman, mariner (q.q.v.).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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