Nonyielding

yielding

[yeel-ding]
adjective
1.
inclined to give in; submissive; compliant: a timid, yielding man.
2.
tending to give way, especially under pressure; flexible; supple; pliable: a yielding mattress.
3.
(of a crop, soil, etc.) producing a yield; productive.

Origin:
1300–50; Middle English: owing; see yield, -ing2

yieldingly, adverb
yieldingness, noun
nonyielding, adjective
unyielding, adjective
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
yielding (ˈjiːldɪŋ)
 
adj
1.  compliant, submissive, or flexible
2.  pliable or soft: a yielding material
 
'yieldingly
 
adv
 
'yieldingness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

yield
O.E. geldan (Anglian), gieldan (W.Saxon) "to pay" (class III strong verb; past tense geald, p.p. golden), from P.Gmc. *geldanan "pay" (cf. O.S. geldan "to be worth," O.N. gjaldo "to repay, return," M.Du. ghelden, Du. gelden "to cost, be worth, concern," O.H.G. geltan, Ger. gelten "to be worth," Goth.
fra-gildan "to repay, requite"), perhaps from PIE *ghel-to- "I pay," found only in Balto-Slavic and Gmc., unless O.C.S. zledo, Lith. geliuoti are Gmc. loan-words. Sense developed in Eng. via use to translate L. reddere, Fr. rendre, and had expanded by c.1300 to "repay, return, render (service), produce, surrender." Related to M.L.G. and M.Du. gelt, Du. geld, Ger. Geld "money." Earliest Eng. sense survives in financial "yield from investments." The noun is O.E. gield "payment, sum of money;" extended sense of "production" (as of crops) is first attested c.1440. Yielding in sense of "giving way to physical force" is recorded from 1665.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary

yield definition


The income from a fixed-income security as a percentage of its market price. For example, if the market price of a bond declines, its yield rises.

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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