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noose

[noos] /nus/
noun
1.
a loop with a running knot, as in a snare, lasso, or hangman's halter, that tightens as the rope is pulled.
2.
a tie or bond; snare.
verb (used with object), noosed, noosing.
3.
to secure by or as by a noose.
4.
to make a noose with or in (a rope or the like).
Origin of noose
late Middle English
1400-1450
1400-50; late Middle English nose < ?
Related forms
nooser, noun
unnoosed, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for noose
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • The fellow with the noose came towards me, and I sprang overboard.

  • Wait till you see me slipping my neck into a noose held by your fingers.

    Davenport Dunn, Volume 2 (of 2) Charles James Lever
  • Across the wide prairie the pony raced, guided by a noose of plaited rawhide.

    Star Forrestine C. Hooker
  • They silenced him by leading him to the wall and adjusting the noose.

    The Plunderer Roy Norton
  • And my friend said to me, “Go and shew yourself to her, and take the noose from her neck;” so I immediately went towards her.

    The Kath Sarit Sgara Somadeva Bhatta
British Dictionary definitions for noose

noose

/nuːs/
noun
1.
a loop in the end of a rope or cord, such as a lasso, snare, or hangman's halter, usually tied with a slipknot
2.
something that restrains, binds, or traps
3.
put one's head in a noose, to bring about one's own downfall
verb (transitive)
4.
to secure or catch in or as if in a noose
5.
to make a noose of or in
Word Origin
C15: perhaps from Provençal nous, from Latin nōdusnode
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for noose
n.

mid-15c., perhaps from Old French nos or cognate Old Provençal nous "knot," from Latin nodus "knot" (see net (n.)). Rare before c.1600.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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