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notary

[noh-tuh-ree] /ˈnoʊ tə ri/
noun, plural notaries.
Origin
1275-1325
1275-1325; Middle English < Latin notārius clerk, equivalent to not(āre) to note, mark + -ārius -ary
Related forms
notaryship, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for notary
  • Buyers must hire a notary to complete a sale, he explained.
  • The buyer and seller also owe fees to the notary who handles the sale.
  • When you buy real estate, you need a lawyer and a notary.
  • You're much better off with your own agreement witnessed by a notary.
  • Applications for appointment as a notary public are reviewed for completeness.
  • All notary forms must be completed and submitted online.
  • Information about the notary public acknowledgment form.
  • As a notary, you enhance trust and confidence in matters that are vital to our state.
  • Description of qualifications for an applicant to become a notary public.
  • Information about the materials that need to be purchased after a notary public is appointed.
British Dictionary definitions for notary

notary

/ˈnəʊtərɪ/
noun (pl) -ries
1.
a notary public
2.
(formerly) a clerk licensed to prepare legal documents
3.
(archaic) a clerk or secretary
Derived Forms
notarial (nəʊˈtɛərɪəl) adjective
notarially, adverb
notaryship, noun
Word Origin
C14: from Latin notārius clerk, from nota a mark, note
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for notary
n.

c.1300, "clerk, secretary," from Old French notarie "scribe, clerk, secretary" (12c.) and directly from Latin notarius "shorthand writer, clerk, secretary," from notare, "to note," from nota "shorthand character, letter, note" (see note (v.)). Meaning "person authorized to attest contracts, etc." is from mid-14c.; especially in notary public (late 15c.), which has the French order of subject-adjective. Related: Notarial.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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