notion's

notion

[noh-shuhn]
noun
1.
a general understanding; vague or imperfect conception or idea of something: a notion of how something should be done.
2.
an opinion, view, or belief: That's his notion, not mine.
3.
conception or idea: his notion of democracy.
4.
a fanciful or foolish idea; whim: She had a notion to swim in the winter.
5.
an ingenious article, device, or contrivance; knickknack.
6.
notions, small articles, as buttons, thread, ribbon, and other personal items, especially such items displayed together for sale, as in a department store.

Origin:
1560–70; < Latin nōtiōn- (stem of nōtiō) examination, idea, equivalent to nōt(us) past participle of nōscere (see notify) + -iōn- -ion

notionless, adjective


1, 3. See idea.
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World English Dictionary
notion (ˈnəʊʃən)
 
n
1.  a vague idea; impression
2.  an idea, concept, or opinion
3.  an inclination or whim
 
[C16: from Latin nōtiō a becoming acquainted (with), examination (of), from noscere to know]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

notion
1533 (implied in notional), from L. notionem (nom. notio) "concept," from notus, pp. of noscere "come to know" (see know). Coined by Cicero as a loan-translation of Gk. ennoia "act of thinking, notion, conception," or prolepsis "previous notion, previous conception." Notions
"miscellaneous articles" (1805, Amer.Eng.) springs from the idea of "clever invention."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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