objection

[uhb-jek-shuhn]
noun
1.
a reason or argument offered in disagreement, opposition, refusal, or disapproval.
2.
the act of objecting.
3.
a ground or cause for objecting.
4.
a feeling of disapproval, dislike, or disagreement.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English objeccioun (< Anglo-French) < Late Latin objectiōn- (stem of objectiō), equivalent to Latin object(us) (see object) + -iōn- -ion

nonobjection, noun
preobjection, noun
superobjection, noun


4. complaint, protest, criticism.
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World English Dictionary
objection (əbˈdʒɛkʃən)
 
n
1.  an expression, statement, or feeling of opposition or dislike
2.  a cause for such an expression, statement, or feeling
3.  the act of objecting

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

objection
late 14c., from O.Fr. objection (12c.), from M.L. obiectionem (nom. obiectio), "a throwing or putting before," noun of action from L. obicere "to oppose" (see object (n.)).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The tower is already under construction, despite critics' objections that it is
  out of scale and visually intrusive.
Others have objections to photographs being made of certain individuals or
  groups.
They raise three major objections to the article's findings.
The complaints and objections, as usual, say a lot for you.
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