observably

observable

[uhb-zur-vuh-buhl]
adjective
1.
capable of being or liable to be observed; noticeable; visible; discernible: an observable change in attitude.
2.
worthy or important enough to be celebrated, followed, or observed: an observable holiday.
3.
deserving of attention; noteworthy.

Origin:
1600–10; < Latin observābilis remarkable, equivalent to observā(re) to observe + -bilis -ble

observability, observableness, noun
observably, adverb
nonobservable, adjective
nonobservably, adverb
unobservable, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
observe (əbˈzɜːv)
 
vb (when intr, usually foll by on or upon; when tr, may take a clause as object)
1.  (tr; may take a clause as object) to see; perceive; notice: we have observed that you steal
2.  (when tr, may take a clause as object) to watch (something) carefully; pay attention to (something)
3.  to make observations of (something), esp scientific ones
4.  to make a comment or remark: the speaker observed that times had changed
5.  (tr) to abide by, keep, or follow (a custom, tradition, law, holiday, etc)
 
[C14: via Old French from Latin observāre, from ob- to + servāre to watch]
 
ob'servable
 
adj
 
ob'servableness
 
n
 
observa'bility
 
n
 
ob'servably
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

observable
c.1600, from L. observabilis, from observare (see observe).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
observable   (əb-zûr'və-bəl)  Pronunciation Key 
A measurable property of a physical system, such as mass or momentum. In quantum mechanics, observables correspond to mathematical operators used in the calculation of measurable quantities. Operators that do not commute, having a nonzero commutator, correspond to observables that cannot be precisely measured at the same time, such as momentum and position. See also uncertainty principle.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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