observation

[ob-zur-vey-shuhn]
noun
1.
an act or instance of noticing or perceiving.
2.
an act or instance of regarding attentively or watching.
3.
the faculty or habit of observing or noticing.
4.
notice: to escape a person's observation.
5.
an act or instance of viewing or noting a fact or occurrence for some scientific or other special purpose: the observation of blood pressure under stress.
6.
the information or record secured by such an act.
7.
something that is learned in the course of observing things: My observation is that such clouds mean a storm.
8.
a remark, comment, or statement based on what one has noticed or observed.
9.
the condition of being observed.
10.
Navigation.
a.
the measurement of the altitude or azimuth of a heavenly body for navigational purposes.
b.
the information obtained by such a measurement.
11.
Obsolete. observance, as of the law.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English < Latin observātiōn- (stem of observātiō), equivalent to observāt(us) (past participle of observāre to observe) + -iōn- -ion

nonobservation, noun
preobservation, noun
reobservation, noun
self-observation, noun

observance, observation.


3. attention. 8. pronouncement, opinion. See remark.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
observation (ˌɒbzəˈveɪʃən)
 
n
1.  the act of observing or the state of being observed
2.  a comment or remark
3.  detailed examination of phenomena prior to analysis, diagnosis, or interpretation: the patient was under observation
4.  the facts learned from observing
5.  an obsolete word for observance
6.  nautical
 a.  a sight taken with an instrument to determine the position of an observer relative to that of a given heavenly body
 b.  the data so taken
 
obser'vational
 
adj
 
obser'vationally
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

observation
late 14c., from L. observationem (nom. observatio) "a watching over," from observatus, pp. of observare (see observe). Meaning "a remark in reference to something observed" first recorded 1590s.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
He wanted to see what would happen, what observation would grow out of that
  strange planting.
They were, rather, the product of rigorous observation and of years of trial
  and error.
Kahlo apparently recognized the truth of this observation and resigned herself
  to the situation.
Writers draw on personal observation, and their work tends to be informed
  heavily by place.
Images for observation
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