of his own accord

accord

[uh-kawrd]
verb (used without object)
1.
to be in agreement or harmony; agree.
verb (used with object)
2.
to make agree or correspond; adapt.
3.
to grant; bestow: to accord due praise.
4.
Archaic. to settle; reconcile.
noun
5.
proper relationship or proportion; harmony.
6.
a harmonious union of sounds, colors, etc.
7.
consent or concurrence of opinions or wills; agreement.
8.
an international agreement; settlement of questions outstanding among nations.
Idioms
9.
of one's own accord, without being asked or told; voluntarily: We did the extra work of our own accord.

Origin:
1100–50; Middle English ac(c)corden, late Old English acordan < Old French acorder < Vulgar Latin *accordāre, equivalent to Latin ac- ac- + cord- heart, mind; see cordial, heart

accordable, adjective
accorder, noun
nonaccord, noun
preaccord, noun, verb (used without object)
unaccordable, adjective
unaccorded, adjective
well-accorded, adjective

accord, afford.


1. harmonize, concur. See correspond. 2. reconcile.


1. conflict. 3. withhold, deny; withdraw.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
accord (əˈkɔːd)
 
n
1.  agreement; conformity; accordance (esp in the phrase in accord with)
2.  consent or concurrence of opinion
3.  with one accord unanimously
4.  pleasing relationship between sounds, colours, etc; harmony
5.  a settlement of differences, as between nations; compromise
6.  of one's own accord voluntarily
 
vb
7.  to be or cause to be in harmony or agreement
8.  (tr) to grant; bestow
 
[C12: via Old French from Latin ad- to + cord-, stem of cor heart]
 
ac'cordable
 
adj
 
ac'corder
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

accord
early 12c., from O.Fr. acorder (12c.), from V.L. *accordare "make agree," lit. "be of one heart," from L. ad- "to" + cor (gen. cordis) "heart" (see heart). The noun was M.E. accourd, from O.Fr. acord, a back-formation from acorder.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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