of one's own accord

accord

[uh-kawrd]
verb (used without object)
1.
to be in agreement or harmony; agree.
verb (used with object)
2.
to make agree or correspond; adapt.
3.
to grant; bestow: to accord due praise.
4.
Archaic. to settle; reconcile.
noun
5.
proper relationship or proportion; harmony.
6.
a harmonious union of sounds, colors, etc.
7.
consent or concurrence of opinions or wills; agreement.
8.
an international agreement; settlement of questions outstanding among nations.
Idioms
9.
of one's own accord, without being asked or told; voluntarily: We did the extra work of our own accord.

Origin:
1100–50; Middle English ac(c)corden, late Old English acordan < Old French acorder < Vulgar Latin *accordāre, equivalent to Latin ac- ac- + cord- heart, mind; see cordial, heart

accordable, adjective
accorder, noun
nonaccord, noun
preaccord, noun, verb (used without object)
unaccordable, adjective
unaccorded, adjective
well-accorded, adjective

accord, afford.


1. harmonize, concur. See correspond. 2. reconcile.


1. conflict. 3. withhold, deny; withdraw.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
accord (əˈkɔːd)
 
n
1.  agreement; conformity; accordance (esp in the phrase in accord with)
2.  consent or concurrence of opinion
3.  with one accord unanimously
4.  pleasing relationship between sounds, colours, etc; harmony
5.  a settlement of differences, as between nations; compromise
6.  of one's own accord voluntarily
 
vb
7.  to be or cause to be in harmony or agreement
8.  (tr) to grant; bestow
 
[C12: via Old French from Latin ad- to + cord-, stem of cor heart]
 
ac'cordable
 
adj
 
ac'corder
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

accord
early 12c., from O.Fr. acorder (12c.), from V.L. *accordare "make agree," lit. "be of one heart," from L. ad- "to" + cor (gen. cordis) "heart" (see heart). The noun was M.E. accourd, from O.Fr. acord, a back-formation from acorder.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Idioms & Phrases

of one's own accord

Also, of one's own free will. Voluntarily, without prompting or coercion, as in The entire audience rose of their own accord, or No, I'm climbing this mountain of my own free will. The first term dates from about 1450, the variant from about 1600.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer.
Copyright © 1997. Published by Houghton Mifflin.
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