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Olbers' paradox

[ohl-berz] /ˈoʊl bərz/
noun, Astronomy
1.
the paradox that if the universe consisted of an infinite number of stars equally distributed through space, then every line of sight would come from a star and the night sky would glow uniformly, which is observationally not true.
Origin
1950-1955
1950-55; after H.W.M. Olbers
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Word Origin and History for olbers-paradox

Olbers' paradox

"if stars are uniformly distributed through the sky, their number should counterbalance their faintness and the night sky should be as bright as the day;" named for German astronomer H.W.M. Olbers (1758-1840), who propounded it in 1826.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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