omission

[oh-mish-uhn]
noun
1.
the act of omitting.
2.
the state of being omitted.
3.
something left out, not done, or neglected: an important omission in a report.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English < Late Latin omissiōn- (stem of omissiō), equivalent to omiss(us) (past participle of omittere to let go; see omit) + -iōn- -ion; see mission

nonomission, noun
preomission, noun

commission, omission.
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World English Dictionary
omission (əʊˈmɪʃən)
 
n
1.  something that has been omitted or neglected
2.  the act of omitting or the state of having been omitted
 
[C14: from Latin omissiō, from omittere to omit]
 
o'missive
 
adj
 
o'missiveness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

omission
late 14c., from L. omissionem (nom. omissio) "an omitting," noun of action from omissus, pp. of omittere (see omit).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The report also attempts to draw a conclusion that does not follow from the
  evidence: that these omissions matter.
But even with genealogical records there are often omissions and biases in
  transmission of information.
In my opinion, one of the biggest omissions in the climate change arguments is
  the costs involved in our making changes.
And such omissions don't merely occur on the news pages.
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